Tag Archives: scicomm

Sailed the Ocean Blue

It’s been estimated that a good percentage of planets beyond our solar system may be water worlds.

We here on mother Earth like to think of our blue green marble as a water world. Indeed it is watery, and water is pretty much the reason anything lives here at all. That’s why astrobiologists naturally seek signs of water on exoplanets. “Follow the Water” is a central tenet in the search for extraterrestrial life.

But compared to some worlds, earth really isn’t that waterlogged at all. It’s 0.002 percent water by mass. Only a tiny fraction of that water is available to terrestrial life. That water which isn’t directly involved in biological processes is linked to them, linking life to the planet via seasons and climate.

Some exoplanets are believed to be up to fifty percent water! These are true ocean worlds. To date, up to thirty five percent of exoplanets larger than may be covered by vast layers of water that may or may not harbour life. The jury is well out on that, but the idea is intriguing (and tempting) as the traditional definition of habitable zones is being stretched and reinterpreted.

A water world with a thick atmosphere of steam.

For now, we have only our imaginations with which to explore these worlds…

An aerial view of remote coastline on a hypothetical watery exoplanet.

A new video!

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Translations

More images.

I’ve been thinking some of these may look good as posters. Thoughts anyone? They provide another way to reach people, as I myself continue to explore and learn about a truly incredible topic.

I like the look and think my channel will finally benefit from a coherent look and vibe. The retro font works for me, and the surreal, fantastic feel of the pictures is my jam.

Channel News

A new video exploring the possibility of directly imaging exoplanets is coming very soon!

Here is a snippet; sans sound or effects just yet!

More coming.

Images of Astrobiology

The universe is turning out to be a more interesting place with each passing day for me. It’s not all about reading research articles and trawling the internet for interesting news in the vast field that is astrobiology.

I’ve been working on images related to various themes in astrobiology. This field really is a playground for the imagination, and it has something for everyone….

Recent news of a relic subsurface biosphere just beneath the surface of Mars…

Our ones and zeroes formed in starlight?

Something really special here: possible traces of limestones found in the fragments of objects orbiting a nearby white dwarf star…

 

Differing definitions of the Habitable Zone further push the limits of life in the universe..

Svante Arhenius, a swedish chemist and early pioneer of the theory of panspermia..

Ruminations on the code (codes?) that make life possible. How many languages does life have in the Universe?

Does the chemical rich, pitch black seabed of Europa host life? Does that of Enceladus?

 

The first image I created. I hope you’ve like these. There will be more! By the way, the background for this image comes from an online simulator called Goldilocks, by Jan Willem Tulp. His work can be found here. It’s really cool.

What’s going on with YouTube and small creators? 

Ok. 

I embarked on my own YouTube journey some two years ago. To say it’s been a frustrating and agonising ride could be rightly called an understatement. Video production has presented me with a massively steep learning curve. I know full well I haven’t come anywhere near perfecting my craft, but it’s one of those labour of love things. Which is one of the reasons I still do it. 

Initially I started the channel with an interest in talking about general science topics. As time went on I realised that in all realism this wasn’t working for me. The subscriber count is still tiny, and the lifetime views number in the very low thousands. This is all part and parcel of finding my feet. Again, this is all part of that learning curve. Since “rebranding” the channel a few months ago I feel I’ve gained a new perspective on the whole affair. 

In that time the monolithic behemoth that is YouTube (Google) has made it fairly clear that small channels aren’t worth their time. A sense of malaise has set in among small channels and I have to admit it’s hard to fight off sometimes. 

Zero prospects for monetisation at this point. Well technically not zero, but a statistically insignificant chance of a small channel getting through the ever shifting goal posts YouTube places before us. 

I don’t begrudge larger channels their success. It is hard work, I’ve learnt that much. They obviously have done the hard yards. We little guys generally know this is the path we must take too. But sometimes an uphill battle becomes something else, and you need to find another reason to continue. 

My channel is AstroBiological. I look at astrobiology. It’s a fun topic but a niche one. I do it right now because I like it. Other channels like mine deserve notice and so I implore the reader to peruse this catalogue of fine educational content, created by WeCreateEdu; a Slack.com group dedicated to giving educational YouTubers the help and resources they need to find their feet. I’m nowhere near there yet, but others are. There are plenty of good people in this list, and all some of them want is for you to watch and enjoy what they have really worked hard to create. It’s a labour of love for many, so there’s an extra sting when they go unnoticed. 

If you’re an educational YouTuber yourself, let’s all work together and help each other toward whatever dream motivates us.

On Twitter:

Take a look at WeCreateEdu (@WeCreateEdu): https://twitter.com/WeCreateEdu?s=09
On Facebook:

https://m.facebook.com/WeCreateEdu
WeCreateEdu is a supportive community and I’ve learnt and lot. Maybe you can too! 

Making videos on your phone. 

A few months ago I was watching a YouTube video which steered me towards the topic of this post. I am a (very small time) youtuber myself, and spend a lot of time looking for ways to tweak my content and make it more polished. The YouTube video mentioned above was made using screen capture software and the simulation package Universe Sandbox. The video featured all kinds of hypothetical scenarios being imagined and allowed to play out within the simulation. For example, the questions were asked: what if Saturn was moved closer to the sun? What if Earth passed through its rings on this inward journey? What if Saturn and Jupiter made a close approach to each other?

It was fascinating to watch. Simulating actual physics and real world parameters you could see what actually could happen if such scenarios actually took place. It got me thinking about my own video content, and about these simulation software packages. I of course had to get my hands on some!

Currently I am producing videos using both my laptop and my smartphone. In this post I will focus on the capabilities of a smartphone to produce videos about outer space.

Animations for this video were produced entirely on my smart phone, using several apps available on Google Play. My phone is an Android device, but I’m assuming there are equivalents over at the enemy camp.

First off, these apps are great educational tools. Perhaps where they are the most effective is getting people to explore from the palm of their hand. In this device obsessed era this is a big deal and also a drawcard for the digit generation. This video explores some mobile apps I’ve been using for my YouTube channel. It’s really amazing what you can do with amazing most nothing! I’ll also include a video about Uranus. All of the planetary animations came from mobile apps. 


The Uranus video:

Here is another earlier video briefly introducing the moons of Mars…


And in this one I discuss Enceladus and some promising signs of habitability there:


These videos were extremely easy to make and perhaps the point of this post is that anyone can communicate something they care about. Enjoy! 

Goldilocks and the Three Planets

Hi all. It’s been a while I’m ashamed to admit. I’ve been working on a new Facebook group to raise the profile of my channel. It’s been fun. Here is the link (hint: join the group!)
Here is my newest video. A basic breakdown of what exactly the Goldilocks (or circumstellar habitable) zone is, and it’s importance to life on Earth. If you like the channel please subscribe!


I’ve also provided the script/transcript for my upcoming episode of “Astro-Biological:”, which introduces us to the concept of the Goldilocks Zone….

G’day! Welcome to Astro-biological:!

Porridge!

Life.

Porridge!

Life!

Ben what the heck are you talking about? What’s the connection?

 Let’s go check out THE GOLDILOCKS ZONE!!!!

INTRO BIT

Life, as I like to remind you, is really special. Here on earth, life exists only because certain conditions are met. Today, we’ll consider water. Everything needs it, but it only exists as a liquid at the surface here on Earth. 

So? Big deal right?

Well it is actually!

Check out the sun. Giver of life! Driver of climate! Pumping out some pretty respectable energy. How much?

384.6 yottawatts.

Yotta whatta?

1 yottawatt equals 10 with 26 zeroes after it!

Brutal! And the sun is a pretty average star! Nothing special about it!So there’s plenty of sunlight for everyone!

Could other planets benefit from the sun’s golden goodness the way we do? Let’s take a look at the inner planets. They’re the only ones that really matter in all this…

Let’s see…Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. The rocky planets. The so called “Terrestrial Planets”. 

Mercury is 58 million kilometres from the sun. That’s really close. This close proximity has turned Mercury’s surface into an oven, where liquid water couldn’t possibly last.

Let’s visit the next in line: Venus. Venus is similar to Earth in composition, gravity and size. Long ago Venus might have had oceans just like Earth, but again the planets closeness to the sun and other factors saw all that water disappear into space. Venus is now the hottest place in the solar system. Definitely no liquid water there anymore!

Wanna know more about what happened to Earth’s twin? This guy I know made a video! 

Earth! Beautiful Earth. Our home. Every thing’s home actually. Eighty per cent of earth’s surface is covered by liquid water. There’s so much spare water here that our bodies are mostly made up of it! It’s absolutely everywhere, even locked up deep in the earth’s crust! Enough of earth. We’ve all been there.

Next planet out:

Mars. The cool planet. Every one wants to go here. Pity it’s so cold! Liquid water may exist here in tiny amounts, but most of the red planet’s water is locked up as ice or permafrost just below it’s surface. Plenty there for future colonists to use, but nothing readily available for biological processes. Pity. It’s a beautiful planet. Just ask Matt Damon!

So what is the Goldilocks Zone then?

Here’s the inner solar system. Mercury, Venus,  Earth and Mars. Let’s visit a special guest who can explain the Goldilocks Zone for us…

Chef Ben bit. (Watch the video when it’s up!)

Nice work Chef! So, if Earth was a bowl of porridge it would be the one Goldilocks ate: the one that was just right! it’s that simple! Earth is lucky enough to be at the perfect distance from the sun, where water likes to slosh around in liquid form. Things would be a lot different here if that wasn’t the case. 

So that’s it for now! A simple but important piece of information. The Goldilocks Zone!

How am I going so far?

If you thought I was alright, then subscribe for more. If you thought this video was useful to you, then give it a like! Likes help this channel get noticed. That little notifications bell is just the thing if you want to see more. Go on. You know you want to.

Thanks for watching astrobiological. Giving you the universe in plain human. Ciao!

Astro-biological: The living universe 

I have been hard at work rebooting my Bens Lab YouTube channel. This has been prompted by a realisation that a niche topic such as astrobiology is not only insanely interesting, it can keep a niche channel alive, away from the blinding glare of the massively monolithic and sucessful general science channels dominating the platform.


Astrobiology is almost too interesting, and there is plenty of scope for all kinds of interesting viewing. It’ll at least be fun making them. There’s also a huge array of related topics, with some room even for a bit of speculation and fun!

To that end I’ve rebadged the channel a little, and here is the first “proper” video from Ben’s Lab presents: astro-biological: